Save - A - Life

SAVE - A - LIFE

The Opioid Epidemic impacts communities and individuals regardless of their economics, social, ethnicity, religious and education status. At Living Positive we were providing services to people directly affected by Opioids usage and this initiated the Save A Life Program which provides FREE Naloxone also known Narcan® to members in the community upon request.   Narcan purpose is to prevent a fatal overdose. When an individual utilize the Narcan kit and prevents a fatal opioid overdose, then they saved a life.

Our Save a Life Program consists of providing:
  • A Narcan kit to each person and that individual becomes a Certified Opioid Overdose Responder. The process to obtain the kit is approximately a 10 minute training on the following:
  • Recognize an overdose of an opioid
  • How to respond and how to use naloxone (Narcan)
  • The individual now Become a Certified Opioid Overdose Responder and receives the Overdose Rescue Kit to save a life.
  • Information about The New York State 911 Good Samaritan Law which allows people to call 911 without fear of arrest if they are having a drug or alcohol overdose that requires emergency medical care or if they witness someone overdosing.   For additional information, please link: English: https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/0139.pdf Spanish:    https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/0139es.pdf
  • Substance Use resources and services that are readily available in their community.  this is solely provided if the individual request resources, treatment, and services.

Have questions about Narcan, please review the FAQ's listed below.

1.  What are the signs of an overdose?

The following are signs of an overdose. Call 911 if the person:

  • Is passed out and cannot be woken up
  • Is not breathing, breathing very slowly, or making gurgling sounds;
  • Has lips that are blue or grayish color.

2.  What is naloxone (also known as Narcan®)?

Naloxone is a prescription drug that temporarily blocks opioid receptors in one’s body in order to reverse an opioid overdose until first responders arrive. Naloxone is administered when an opioid overdose is suspected. It can be given through a needle, a nasal spray (Narcan®), or an auto-injector (Evzio®). Narcan® is usually the option that is most cost-effective and easy to administer.

3. Where can I learn how to administer naloxone?

The staff at Living Positive are trained to teach individuals to administer Naloxone. We provide the training's at our program, various facilities and in the community at a safe & confidential location.

4.  Can naloxone be dangerous if accidentally given to someone who isn’t actually overdosing?

Naloxone has no known adverse effects if given to someone who isn’t actually overdosing or who did not take opioids.

5.  Does my state allow naloxone?

Yes, all 50 states allow medical providers to prescribe naloxone to patients who are at risk for an opioid overdose. However, 46 states have also implemented standing orders allowing anyone to purchase naloxone through their pharmacies. Standing orders are like invisible prescriptions that we can all access. For example, flu shots are often given under a standing order.

6.  What’s a standing order?

A standing order is issued when the top physician of the state sees the need for a prescription drug to be made more easily available to the public without a written prescription from their personal physician.

The  following items are also on the following

link: https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/aids/general/opioid_overdose_prevention/good _samaritan_law.htm

Why should you care about the 911 Good Samaritan Law?

  • The law empowers you to save a person's life.
  • The law encourages anyone to call 911 when they see or experience a drug or alcohol overdose.

Who is protected by the 911 Good Samaritan Law?

  • Everyone - regardless of age - who seeks medical help for themselves or someone else during an overdose.
  • The person who has overdosed.
The law protects YOU from charges and prosecutions for:
  • Possessing controlled substances up to and including A2 felony offenses (anything under 8 ounces);
  • Possessing alcohol, where underage drinking is involved;
  • Possessing marijuana (any quantity);
  • Possessing drug paraphernalia; and
  • Sharing drugs.
The law DOES NOT protect you from the following:
  • A1 felony possession of a controlled substance (8 ounces or more);
  • Sale or intent to sell controlled substances;
  • Open warrants for your arrest; and
  • Violation of probation or parole.